Looking At The Queen Anne Hotel in New Orleans – A Reminder Of Our Own Rocky Mount NC Treasures – Preservation and Perspective

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The Queen Anne Hotel has a steep gabled roof, asymmetrical shape and dormer windows Named for its style of architecture, dating from 1880-1910.

IF ONLY….those cities that are trying to revitalize their historic downtown core areas all had a Queen Anne Hotel like the one pictured above. But wait, here in Rocky Mount we have a trove of architectural gems and a fascinating history surrounding our downtown area.  We have any number of homes that could become a Queen Anne Hotel. We must not take for granted the communities architectural assets. The Queen Anne Hotel demonstrates the importance of the preservation of these assets.

The Queen Anne Hotel is located in the heart of the Garden District, originally developed between 1832 and 1900 and is considered one of the best-preserved collections of historic mansions in the Southern United States. The Hotel is an elegant 1890’s Victorian mansion, a prime example of the spacious homes built by Americans who settled the area following the Louisiana Purchase. The area now know as the Garden District is filled with architecturally notable residences and nestled in lush grounds on oak‐lined streets. A very early example of a luxury suburb, it was dubbed the “Garden District” by travel writers as early as 1852.

In addition to its grand residences, the area is made up of more modest homes in many sizes and styles, as well as a cemetery, Lafayette Cemetery No. 1, a shopping corridor along Magazine Street and a large public avenue, St. Charles Avenue. The Garden District remains a tightly knit community still occupied by families who have been a part of New Orleans’ most famous social traditions since the 19th century. The district was laid out by New Orleans architect, planner, and surveyor Barthelemy Lafon. Does Rocky Mount not have grand residences, modest homes in many sizes and styles?

Originally the area was developed with only a couple of houses per block, each surrounded by a large garden, giving the district its name. In the late 19th century, some of these large lots were subdivided, as Uptown New Orleans became more urban. This has produced a pattern for much of the neighborhood: of any given block having a couple of early 19th-century mansions surrounded by “gingerbread”-decorated late Victorian period houses. The Garden District is listed in the National Register of Historic Places and designated a National Historic Landmark.

Change the names around, think of our five historic districts: Edgemont, West Haven, Rocky Mount Mills, FallsRoad, Villa Place and Central City. Think of the homes associated with D. J. Rose’s fantastic craftsmanship, and much MORE. No matter how small or insignificant you may think your home is, it is part of our large Rocky Mount neighborhood. Preserve it, fix what is broken as you are able, paint, plant a flower. We may not live in New Orlean’s Garden District, but our neighborhoods are historic and just as worthy. It’s our little piece of heaven to take care of. Help breath new life into the revitalization of Rocky Mount.

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Taking nothing away from this beautiful Queen Anne Hotel’s interior photo, in a future post yet to be written, you will see that it pales in comparison to an interior by Rocky Mount’s D.J. Rose. You’ll see.

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About Stepheny Forgue Houghtlin

Stepheny Forgue Houghtlin grew up in Evanston, IL. and is a graduate of the University of Kentucky. She is an author of two novels: The Greening of a Heart and Facing East. She lives, writes and gardens in NC. Visit her: Stephenyhoughtlin.com
This entry was posted in Reimagining Rocky Mount and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink.

2 Responses to Looking At The Queen Anne Hotel in New Orleans – A Reminder Of Our Own Rocky Mount NC Treasures – Preservation and Perspective

  1. Linda says:

    I thank you again, Stepheny, for your research and passion.

    Like

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