About Stepheny

Stepheny Forgue Houghtlin lives in Nashville, NC with her husband,where she writes and gardens. Moving from Chapel Hill/Durham, NC in May 2013, she soon made her first visit to downtown Rocky Mount. Delighted with the streetscape, and beautiful architecture along the Main street and adjacent areas, she was devastated that many of these amazing buildings have gone silent. Though living in Nashville, Rocky Mount is the marker she uses when telling friends where she now lives. She shops at Harris Teeter, and other local businesses, attends St. Andrews Episcopal Church, is a member of Tar River Orchestra & Chorus (TROC) League, and belongs to the Rocky Mount Garden Club.

Stepheny, an author of two novels, publishes a second blog about writing, books, gardening, and has taken her readers on five day blog tours to Chicago, Charleston and the Cotswolds. Visit her at Stepheny Forgue Houghtlin.

Hoping to help promote this area, she has launched Main Street Rocky Mount.   You are invited to Follow this site, which is built around the theme, honoring the past, building a future. Please share this link with your Facebook friends and on other social media sites, and with the members of the organizations you are involved with to help spread Stepheny’s positive message.

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6 Responses to About Stepheny

  1. LouAnn Haddock says:

    Hello Stepheny! My dad grew up in Nash County in the early 1900s, although our family was transplanted to Greenville, NC (just down the road) in the early 1950s. In my recent family research for membership in the Daughters of the American Revolution, I discovered my Patriot, James Drake, had a direct connection to the “Old Nash” apple brandy of which you wrote in one of your 1995 Main Street pieces about Rocky Mount and the railroad. Currently, I am writing my own “fiction” piece based on an incident involving both my ancestor and the brandy. Wonder if during your research you were able to gain more details on anything related to the Old Nash? Thanks for your consideration.I look forward to hearing back from you.
    LouAnn Dickens Haddock
    Greenville, NC

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    • Hi LouAnn: For well over a month I have been out of commission with a cough that won’t go away. Would love to help you by asking others who might know about “Old Nash.” but for now can only acknowledge the project that you have written about. Let me get back to you when I am feeling more myself, hopefully with some help. You must come over and let’s have lunch and wander around together. in the meantime keep researching the era, clothes, music, background for your writing. One of my favorite things about writing a novel. Hold the thought, I’ll be back in touch. Stepheny

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      • Tim Pridgen says:

        What would you like to know about Old Nash? My family made gallons of it, along with old fashion Corn Liquor. Most families here in Nash County made it to subsidize their income because the agriculture base in this area did not meet the needs of “share cropper” families. They had to rely on something to make ends meet and since corn and apples were abundant here, they were put to good use. I can give you some recipes if you are interested.

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      • Thank you, Tim: I have copied and pasted your comment to LouAnn Haddock and I am sure it will be useful. You were great to take the time. Thank you. Hope the two of you get to talk.

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    • Here is information I hope will help. This comment is from Tim Pridgen tapridgen@aol.com

      What would you like to know about Old Nash? My family made gallons of it, along with old fashion Corn Liquor. Most families here in Nash County made it to subsidize their income because the agriculture base in this area did not meet the needs of “share cropper” families. They had to rely on something to make ends meet and since corn and apples were abundant here, they were put to good use. I can give you some recipes if you are interested.

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  2. Robert "Bruce" Sharer says:

    I arrived in Rocky Mount at the age of 16 in 1960 with my family. I walked to RMSHS from Sycamore Street. I remember passing several grand homes/mansions along the way. The Mims house and the Battle house to name two. I worked in downtown Rocky Mount the summer of 1961 before going off to college. What I saw over the next fifteen years before I left Rocky Mount was a failure of foresight in the leaders of the town. Also, the demise of downtown and the Edgecombe side of town can be attributed to the failure of some leaders to understand the long term cost of continued segregation. I enjoyed living in Rocky Mount, and I have many friends still there. I visit once or twice a year because of events at North Carolina Wesleyan College where I graduated. Recently, I have been happy to see progress being made in the revitalization of downtown. Rocky Mount is a jewel in Eastern North Carolina, and deserves to be returned to its’ former greatness.

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