Nancy Drew – The Case Of The Missing Election

Nancy Drew is a fictional amateur sleuth in the series written for girls after the great success of The Hardy Boys. She lives in the fictional town of River Heights with her father, attorney Carson Drew, and their housekeeper, Hannah Gruen. As a teenager, she spends her time-solving mysteries. Nancy is often described as a supergirl. In the words of one of the characters, Bobbie Ann Mason, she is “as immaculate and self-possessed as a Miss America on tour. She is as cool as Mata Hari and as sweet as Betty Crocker.” Nancy is well-off, attractive, and amazingly talented. Why wouldn’t I pick her to be the detective on the case of The Missing Election?

From her notes, Nancy Drew is offering below a few facts of the case. She is quoted as saying, “The postponement of the election of four seats on the City Council in 2021 is the last thing Rocky Mount NC needs. It is bad enough that at least two of the seven seats continue to hold the city hostage with their ‘My Will Be Done’ agenda, but adding another year without the opportunity to fill those seats with new leadership is unthinkable. The chance that the City Council would vote to hold the election at their own peril is unlikely.”

Census delay likely to postpone city elections
AMELIA HARPER Staff Writer Feb 23, 2021 (Excerps)
Nash County Elections Director John Kearney said Monday during a meeting of the Nash County Board of Elections that due to delays in the release of 2020 U.S. Census data, this year’s election in Rocky Mount likely will be postponed.

“It is anticipated that the 2020 census data will not be available until September, so that means that none of the towns or council members or anyone else is going to be able to get that data to work on redistricting,” he said. “The main issue here is the City of Rocky Mount because it has wards.”

“The U.S. Census Bureau delayed its field operations due to the COVID-19 pandemic and asked Congress for authority to delay the release of census data by 120 days,” the statement said. “This would delay the release of data used by North Carolina for redistricting legislative and congressional seats and local offices elected by district. This would compress the timeline for redistricting. If changes are needed to the districts of municipal offices elected by district and the census data is not released in time, elections for these offices scheduled to take place in the fall of 2021 could be postponed until 2022.” Because of this, Kearney said he is “99.9 percent sure that the City of Rocky Mount elections will not be held until the primary election of 2022.”

“I can’t do filing before the redistricting is done and the City of Rocky Mount cannot address redistricting until the census data is released,” Kearney said. “The normal filing period for the City of Rocky Mount elections normally begins on July 26, well before the time that the census data will be released.”

Kearney said in a later interview it is possible that the City Council could decide to proceed with the elections with the current wards. However, that decision would likely open up the likelihood of a slew of lawsuits, he said.

Four City Council seats are up for election this year: the Ward 2 seat occupied by Reuben Blackwell; the Ward 3 seat held by Richard Joyner; the Ward 6 seat occupied by W.B. Bullock and the Ward 7 seat held by Chris Miller.

Further Research Shows The process remains in the State Legislature’s control.

In 25 states, the state legislature has primary responsibility for creating a redistricting plan, in many cases subject to approval by the state governor. In North Carolina, state lawmakers will play a significant role in that effort in the months to come.

The 2020 census results should be released this spring. Once they are, the Republican-led legislature will begin drawing new political maps that would be used through the 2030 elections. The census will likely show North Carolina is one of the fastest-growing states in the country. That’s expected to lead to an extra seat in Congress, increasing the House delegation from 13 to 14 seats.

Nancy Drew will remain on the case of The Missing Election as long as necessary. Ms. Drew said, “The failure on the part of the US Census Bureau to finish their work on time is preposterous. Those citizens that participated did their part. Using Covid as an excuse is not acceptable. In Rocky Mount’s case, the postponement of the fall election only prolongs the price the taxpayers are paying under the ‘My Will Be Done’ agenda with characters that have stayed long enough in office.”

Commissioner Guido Brunetti Sheds Light On Councilmen Knight and Blackwell

I have traveled to Italy on a wonderful garden tour in Tuscany. To this day I revisit memories that I relish. I’ve researched and used both Lucca and Pienza, my two favorite cities, for locations in my second novel, Facing East. The tour did not include Venice, but I’ve spent hours there through the mystery series written by Donna Leon. Over time I have come to consider the intelligent and capable Police Commissioner, Guido Brunetti as one of my most interesting and likable friends who waits for me on the pages of Leon’s books. Brunetti and the ensemble of characters never fail to deliver a satisfying mystery. In each book, Leon explores Venice and its wide spectrum of issues. In finishing the latest Leon read, Through a Glass, Darkley, I found an interesting corollary to help me think about Councilmen, Knight, and Blackwell who persist in maintaining control over everything. If challenged, asked questions, their deflection is the predictable accusation of racism that motivates scrutiny. I continue to look for answers on how this is allowed to go on. Brunetti was helpful.

Brunetti is an erudite man. In this case, he is thinking about Dante’s Inferno. What category would Dante have assigned the villain? To the hoarders, who are condemned to push their heavy stone, for all eternity? Thinking about these categories, Brunetti remembers a report in a science column in La Repubblica on experiments done with people suffering from Alzheimer’s. Many of them lost the use of the brain mechanism that told them when they were hungry or full. If given food repeatedly, they would eat again and again, unconscious of the fact that they had just eaten and should no longer be hungry. Brunetti finds this applicable to people afflicted with the disease of greed: the concept of ‘enough’ had been eliminated from their minds.

Frustrated, amazed, and baffled, I keep waiting for justice, that does not come. Without shame, Council meeting after meeting, the ‘My Will Be Done’ agenda persists. Mr. Blackwell’s seat is available. His Ward may reelect him, but at a great cost to the city. After twenty-plus years, what started out as good intentions and energy to serve, has become skullduggery on steroids. It is never ‘enough.’ This is what happens when greed takes over. Case in point, The Unity Cemetery project by volunteers that represent the U N I T Y that is possible in Rocky Mount. That fact sent two councilmen into orbit. Scroll down to read any comments that may be left on each blog post.

The Restoration of Unity Cemetery Brought Back A Campfire Story

SETTING THE STAGE FOR A STORY: First, you must put on your Norman Rockwell glasses to return to a time of innocence, of patriotism, where a boy and girl sit at the soda fountain drinking from two straws, a sleeping boy is nestled with his dog beside him, of the family gathered around the Thanksgiving table. The Post Magazine covers captured a time and a place through Rockwell’s artistry that seems long ago and far away. While looking at William Manley’s photographs of the restoration of Unity Cemetery, it took me back to a story I once listened to while sitting in the woods around the campfire, and shooting sparks disappeared into the darkness above us. The circle of faces around the campfire glowed in the light of the fire.

The YMCA played a big part in my life. The girl’s department and staff helped form who we became. After ditching a meeting I was to attend with the director of the Women and girl’s department, in favor of fries, a cherry coke, and friends, down at Cooley’s Cubbard, I was called on the carpet. It was explained that as one of the leaders in my class, things were expected. I was told, “to those much is given, much is expected.” I have never forgotten this admonition from a significant authority figure in my life that I loved and did not want to disappoint. I would be a different person were I growing up today. Correcting behavior and offering a moral compass to a young person isn’t allowed.

The Y had a two-week girls camp every August that I first attended after 4th grade. My last year at Camp Echo in Fremont, Michigan was the summer after I married. I was the Assistant camp director to Zenol Moore, who explained what was expected of me. I saw the Borealis for the first time at camp. Waking everyone, the camp girls brought out their sleeping bags and on our backs, we watched the flickering colors and movement. Another summer, a group of girls, flashlight in hand, made their way into the woods to the campfire site and listened to a story. Zenol was the storyteller. The younger girl’s eyes were becoming heavy after a full day. In the firelight, Zenol told about a village church where one by one the villagers came, lanterns swaying. The light from the individual lanterns began to fill the church. Even one missing light was noticeable. Do those girls remember the ‘moral of the story?’ How important each of us is, bringing light to the world. The girl that remains within me, remembers the shinny faces, the singing, the smell of the woods, the silhouette of the trees around us, and the story.

On February 6th, 2021, many volunteers came to Unity Cemetery, spreading out across the sections they worked on, I believe they also brought their light-filled hearts. UNITY is what they are about and their unity is the flame we can light our candles from.

This is written for the Unity Cemetery Volunteers with respect and admiration for the light they bring. (SFH)

 

The Eternal Varieties of Councilmen Knight and Blackwell

I have spent some quiet time since the City Council meeting this past Monday wrestling with how to hold the eternal varieties of the discussion over Unity Cemetery. These adjective words describe the situation that night.

without beginning or end; lasting forever; always existing 
perpetual; ceaseless; endless:
eternal quarreling; eternal chatter.

Photographer William Manley and others have provided powerful images of the Unity Cemetery restoration; a holy place where members of the community of saints rest. The response, the selflessness, the hearts that took this burial site from talking to action is the greatest example of preservation and restoration. Preserving the history and the story that each headstone represents is like an architectural dig: carefully peeling back the layers of leaves, brush, and fallen limbs that have blanketed the cemetery for a long time.  I do not speak for this group of volunteers, but I know they will not be deterred by the perpetual, ceaseless, and endless rhetoric on display Monday night. 

The deep and serious tone of concern in the voices of both Councilmen is predictable now that this carefully organized effort and large response have happened.  Mr. Blackwell went so far as to infer that someone might deliberately destroy the black history at Unity. Never mind the years that have only become urgent now.  Mr. Knight began with records of the Council in 2007 that are meant to prove their interference now. It was said, “We need to hire someone to do this right.” “Someone might get hurt.” It’s the City’s responsibility to see after this for the community.” I hope you remember the word, ‘blarney.’ I would like to add, ‘such blarney.’ 

These volunteers on Saturday are a dream come true. Volunteers that have come together IN UNITY are now a big problem! The reason is that these two Councilmen won’t allow anything to happen that isn’t under their control. This position is perpetual; ceaseless and endless. The fall election could free the community from one vote that has assumed the right to a lifetime position. There is no hope for me who continues to get mad and stomp around. The UNITY CEMETERY advocates know better. They have already risen above this eternal chatter. We cheer them on, which is ‘meet and right so to do.’

“Leadership is the capacity to translate vision into reality.” –Warren G. Bennis

Adrienne Copland, President of Preservation Rocky Mount, Calls The New Board To Order 2/9/21

When you read about the new agenda and the upgraded version of PRM, I hope you will pay a single membership of $20.00 and add your voice to the year’s agenda, announced this evening by the new president. The presence of PRM in the community, their leadership, and commitment to the Preservation of Rocky Mount’s story and architectural assets is essential. With renewed energy and purpose, it is the time to get involved with a significant piece of the revitalization of Rocky Mount. Below you will find the new talented board members and the five returning members. Main Street is delighted to highlight these creative, knowledgeable, professional, people with their hearts for Preservation.

Block One: Adrienne Copland, Whit Barnes, Lea Henry

Block Two: Tessa Wood-Woolard, John Jesso, Tierra Norwood

Block Three: Sarah Tripolli Johnson

Block Four: Jean Bailey, Whitney Shearin, Stepheny Houghtlin

Block Five: Wanda Alford, Renny Taylor

Preservation Rocky Mount Meeting Tonight – Zoom in with us!

Join PRMs January 2021 Business Meeting with the ZOOM Link Below 
PRM Business Meeting
Date: Monday, January 25, 2021 from 6:00-6:30PM
Location: Virtual Meeting via ZOOM
Members Only

Thank you for registering for Preservation Rocky Mount’s annual business meeting, where we will elect our incoming Officers and Board Members. And, thank you for supporting PRM by being a member. With your support we retain the architectural heritage, neighborhood character, and historic landscapes of the Rocky Mount, North Carolina area through collaboration, education, advocacy, and restoration.

Click the link below to participate in the business meeting. The meeting agenda is as follows:

  • Welcome and 2020 Reflections by 2020 President of PRM, Alicyn Wiedrich
  • Incoming Officer and Board Elections by 2020 Vice President of PRM, Jean Bailey
  • Debut of short documentary about City Lake by local high school students
  • Short film about restoration of Stonewall Manor made possible by PRM
ZOOM into PRM Business Meeting
The meeting will begin promptly at 6:00PM. Admins will start letting people in to join the meeting no later than 5:55PM. If you do not have a camera or audio on your phone, you may also call in to the meeting:

Meeting ID: 985 8309 2647
Passcode: 545400
One tap mobile
+1-929-205-6099,,98583092647#,,,,*545400# US (New York)
+1-301-715-8592,,98583092647#,,,,*545400# US (Washington DC)

Our mailing address is:
301 S Church Street
Suite 136
Rocky Mount, NC 27804

Troy White: Progress On Howard Street

You already know that Howard Street is always on my radar screen. It suits my imagination to a tee because of its location, tucked away like your grandmother’s antique ring in a satin ring box. In the light it sparkles and greatly admired.  Troy White is the wind under the sails of the two buildings being restored and repurposed; the rendering of the outcome in the lead photo. The alley-like passageway down Howard Street still lacks a continuity. Continuing the methaphor, as you walk the block, it is like costume jewelry thrown in a box, a little of this and that. When these two buildings are complete, the energy and inspiration they will reflect, becomes a template for success.  Move to Howard Street, create a business, shine up what you have. As a Howard Street cheerleader, I say, give me a P, give me a R, give me a I, give me a D, give me a E.  Thanks!

I hope by now you agree that preservation is art. I’m grateful when it presents itself.  Here, the sun shines through the upper framing. I believe this light will remain within this building as a new life emerges for both buildings. I still haven’t met Troy White but when I do, I will hug him for all of us for this investment on Howard Street and his heart that believes in preservation, restoration and repurposing. I am thankful he is doing these things here.  

PS:                                                                                                                                                                                                                     Two large containers filled with seasonal flowers at each end of the street, would be a nice invitation to stroll, perhaps meet a few of the lucky neighbors that live along this special street. I also think box containers filled with herbs placed here and there would contribute to this neighborhood’s charm. Flowers, outdoor seating where neighbors could enjoy being outside. Possibilities, that’s what this street is full of.

The Importance of Art On Main Street

Street Art is Freedom and Diversity

Street Art is about freedom, creativity, and a way to ask and raise questions, to protest and beautify. It steps beyond convention. You don’t need to be a ‘legitimate’ artist with name recognition, or a large social media presence. People accept the creative and talented people involved in street art as artists. The photograph below are of the nicest young people creating street art in front of the Event Center. They are friendly, and willing to explain the process. Knee pads a must.

“In the last couple of years I have come to appreciate street art. I now go out of my way to see this art and take walking tours when offered. There are many reasons why people love street art and why it is becoming more popular. Street art is an important part of history and identity, and the ability to breathe life into communities.” -Janaline, World Journey Blog.

As a gardener, I agree that every garden should have a little whimsy in it. The revitalization of Rocky Mount would be bereft without art in many forms. Street art has whimsy, color and energy. I love that it doesn’t take itself too seriously.  These young artists who are working on this project, spelling out – END RACISM, will leave a piece of themselves for the duration of this display. I hope they will come back in a few years and create something new that will continue to attract  people downtown to see this changing art through the years. It was great fun to be with these young artists and absorb their enthusiasm and camaraderie.  

We don’t all agree about when the accusation of racism is appropriate. When this name-calling is employed in City Council as a reaction to criticism, it is recognized for that.  We all agree that in and of itself,  ending racism is a must. I’m grateful that Rocky Mount’s new instillation is not angry or cause for further division. Let’s celebrate these artists and the positive effect it will have on bringing people downtown. If you want to see wonderful photos of this same work, check out – William Manley – photographer. He does this street art justice.

I’m in Love With Another Building – It’s a Mess, But Wonderful None the Less 216 S. Washington

Those born or raised here, leave a comment below and tell us what you know.

   “I have often wondered what it is an old building can do to you when you happen to know a little about things that went on long ago in that building”.
Carl Sandburg

When you fall in love with an old building, look for                                                                                                                    the soul to that building, and the building will tell you how to save it.                                                                                                                                                  

(I edited a quote from Cameron Mackintosh to suit my purposes)





Throwing Coins In The Fountain

Originally, tossing a coin in the fountain was supposed to ensure good health. The meaning evolved. People believed that the dwellers of a well would grant them their wish if they threw a lucky coin to pay a price. The tradition of dropping pennies in ponds and fountains stems from this. While growing up, most of us put coins in a piggy bank, either breaking it open or pulling a plastic plug in it’s belly to remove the coins when needed. I have a grown-up piggy bank; a red tin English phone box that came with candy inside.   

“What’s this about Stepheny?”

“Whitaker’s NC Preservation group had a spaghetti fund raiser this past fall on a Sat. It cost $7.00. I have a soft spot in my heart for this group. They asked me to come and speak when they were getting started. You couldn’t help but love them with their dreams, hopes, and plans to save their ‘Main Street.’ I decided I would save quarters from the day I read about the event until the day I got in my car to drive to Whitakers. I had $20.00 to take with me.”


Nancy Jones Taylor and Stepheny – not out best photo but all I have. Nancy is the wind under the sails of Whitaker Preservation

I hope you read the last blog post about the updated version of PRM. If not, please do. I invite you to start throwing coins in a Preservation Rocky Mount mason jar. I only saved $20.00 in my tin bank by the day of the Whitakers preservation fundraiser. Not much, but we all know every little bit helps. I don’t know the exact fundraising project that we will need your mason jar for, I only know it will be welcomed at the right time. I know the project will be worthwhile and you will want to help. The new board will be voted upon on January 25 at a 6:00 Zoom member’s meeting. I’ll be providing a link for the 1/2 hour meeting when it becomes available. In the mean time, if you hear someone humming in your ear, Three Coins in a Fountain, that will be me.