Throwing Coins In The Fountain

Originally, tossing a coin in the fountain was supposed to ensure good health. The meaning evolved. People believed that the dwellers of a well would grant them their wish if they threw a lucky coin to pay a price. The tradition of dropping pennies in ponds and fountains stems from this. While growing up, most of us put coins in a piggy bank, either breaking it open or pulling a plastic plug in it’s belly to remove the coins when needed. I have a grown-up piggy bank; a red tin English phone box that came with candy inside.   

“What’s this about Stepheny?”

“Whitaker’s NC Preservation group had a spaghetti fund raiser this past fall on a Sat. It cost $7.00. I have a soft spot in my heart for this group. They asked me to come and speak when they were getting started. You couldn’t help but love them with their dreams, hopes, and plans to save their ‘Main Street.’ I decided I would save quarters from the day I read about the event until the day I got in my car to drive to Whitakers. I had $20.00 to take with me.”


Nancy Jones Taylor and Stepheny – not out best photo but all I have. Nancy is the wind under the sails of Whitaker Preservation

I hope you read the last blog post about the updated version of PRM. If not, please do. I invite you to start throwing coins in a Preservation Rocky Mount mason jar. I only saved $20.00 in my tin bank by the day of the Whitakers preservation fundraiser. Not much, but we all know every little bit helps. I don’t know the exact fundraising project that we will need your mason jar for, I only know it will be welcomed at the right time. I know the project will be worthwhile and you will want to help. The new board will be voted upon on January 25 at a 6:00 Zoom member’s meeting. I’ll be providing a link for the 1/2 hour meeting when it becomes available. In the mean time, if you hear someone humming in your ear, Three Coins in a Fountain, that will be me.