News -A New Bungalow Society Rocky Mount NC

As of this moment we now have a Bungalow Society with a membership of one…Stepheny Houghtlin. By leaving a comment below, join the Society. No dues, but you must see their potential and the significance of saving them. If you live in a bungalow, fantastic. The Society needs you. The mission is to bring awareness to our bungalow inventory, become their voices, and promote saving them on our social media platforms. Pictured below is a bungalow in Ward #3 on Hargrove Street.

A bungalow is a small cottage-type home, usually built as a one-story dwelling without stairs. Bungalows typically feature sloped roofs, open floor plans, large front windows, and broad front porches. Depending on the style, bungalows can feature more than one story. The Arts and Crafts movement ushered the American-style bungalow into prominence during the early twentieth century.

Pictured above is a 1928 – 1,345ft – Belmont bungalow in Charlotte NC. Fully remodeled in 2013 this home provides 1900‘s charm with modern day conveniences. In 2014 the rear porch was extended and screened along with a stamped concrete driveway and oversized two car garage. Great front porch, fireplace, hardwoods, modern finishes and appliances, spacious three season patio.

Identifying a bungalow:

*Exterior: Square, tapered columns, sometimes called “bungalow columns.” *Balanced and well-proportioned. *A low, exposed roof, often with beams or rafters showing
*A modest front porch or veranda. *Interior: Usually 1.5 stories *The front door opens to the main living space *An open floor plan that lacks a formal parlor or sitting room *Simple decorative accents

Rocky Mount Bungalow Society’s Dream Come True

Bungalows as we know them were first built in India in the mid-nineteenth century by the British. Built low to the ground, the structure had large porches sheltered by wide overhanging eaves, that dealt with the country’s hot, sunny climate. The American version of the bungalow did not appear until the turn of the century. First built in southern California, where most landmark examples of the style are found, it was the dominant style in the United States between 1905 and 1930. Few of these houses were built after 1930.

Easy to build, bungalows could be adapted to almost any taste or region. At the height of the style’s popularity, several companies sold bungalow kits through mail-order catalogs. Sears, Roebuck & Company started selling plans and building supplies in 1895, but it was the Aladdin Company of Bay City, Michigan, that in 1906 started to offer complete kits. All the building components (pre-cut lumber, nails, doors, plumbing) were delivered to the construction site, where local craftsmen erected the homes according to the kit instructions.

Call to Action: E-mail me at houghtlinstepheny@gmail.com with contact e-mail. We are all going to have sweet tea when the weather is warmer in front of a Rocky Mount Bungalow and celebrate forming the RMBS

3 thoughts on “News -A New Bungalow Society Rocky Mount NC

  1. The bungalow had more to do with how Americans live today than any other building that has gone remotely by the name of architecture in our history.— Russell Lynes

    A city where everyone seemed to live in a bungalow on a broad avenue lined with palm, pepper or eucalyptus trees, where there was never any snow.— Kevin Starr

    It’s a great city to live in. I’m living a very suburban domesticated lifestyle out there – a two bedroomed little bungalow with two cars, and we’re just driving around, going to meetings here and there – it’s lovely!— Ioan Gruffudd

    A raintree bent towards a window in one side of the bungalow, eavesdropping on the conversations that had taken place inside over years.— Tan Twan Eng

    What I wanted was some dreamlike Frank Lloyd Wright bungalow where we could sit on the veranda forever and it would always be twilight in the temperate zones, in the most beautiful house.— William Kittredge

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