Telling Our Architectural Story – Part Of Welcoming New People To Rocky Mount

Villa Place Historic District. Located at 326 Howell St.

In 1923 one of Rocky Mount’s architectural gems was moved to what became the Villa Place Historic District. This Queen Anne Victorian home holds court on 326 Howell Street. This house is known as the  W.D. Cochran home. It is one of the dwindling examples of two-story Queen Anne’s that once stood near the central business district: What I call Main Street and nearby areas on this blog. Local architect, John C. Stout, designed the house that began its life in the 300 block of South Main Street. Think about how improved methods are today to accomplish this complicated feat.

In returning from The Main Street Conference, I can tell you that the word is out. When asked where I was from, I didn’t bother with the Nashville fact and said–“Rocky Mount.” Many responses acknowledged knowing about the positive things happening here. Many had been to the Mill! We’re expecting a big influx of new neighbors who are moving to Rocky Mount because of jobs coming our way and ……. because of the emerging Main Street scene. Many have arrived. If you work in real estate and aren’t telling the story and showing clients our historic district locations, you are not on the revitalization train.  Encourage people to take advantage of a great price, do the HGTV-thing, save and preserve one of the many historic gems as an exciting and satisfying adventure. Start with Villa Place, Edgemont and, and, and.

I LOVE VILLA PLACE – -It is a nine-block neighborhood located three blocks west of Main Street. It is the most intact turn-of-the-century residential subdivision in the city of Rocky Mount. The densely developed neighborhood is filled with well-preserved Queen Anne, Foursquare Bungalows, Craftsman, Colonial Revival and Neoclassical Revival style houses built between 1900 and the 1940s by employees of the Atlantic Coast Line Railroad and other businesses in the bustling railroad and tobacco town. The West End Land Development Company laid out the east half of the district in 1891 and sold lots until 1907 when the American Suburban Corporation took over the development. In 1913 this company platted the west half of the district as Villa Place. The entire area is now known by this name. The principal district landmark is Machaven, a Neoclassical Revival style brick mansion built in the middle of the subdivision in 1908 from a design by Raleigh architect H. P. S. Keller. Thanks to investor Jesse Gerstl, Machaven is open again. The strong local significance of Villa Place in the history of Rocky Mount’s community development and architectural development is a great part of our story that all incoming folks will appreciate knowing.

Here we have photos of the 1895 historic Jones-Lee house that has been moved to 304 S. Greene St., Greenville, from Wilson, NC.  Solo Farm and Food Restaurant moved and restored this beautiful house that is now open in its new location. Our Howell Street Cochran House was moved but a few blocks. Think of what this Greenville relocation was like. You know what I say…anything they can do we can do better.  Here is another example that provides inspiration for what preservation and restoration can accomplish.

306 Villa is on the Demolition List – If Lost – Can It Serve as Our Penn Station

306 Villa in the Villa Place Historic District

“We strain to listen to the ghosts and echoes of our inexpressibly wise past, and we have an obligation to maintain these places, to provide these sanctuaries, so that people may be in the presence of forces larger than those of the moment.”
 Ken Burns

Adrienne Copland is an active voice in the Rocky Mount preservation world and at the moment is an advocate for the house at 306 Villa.  Those of you who read the new Facebook page by the same name as this blog, may recognize this photograph I wrote about a few weeks back.

This house on the demolition list was built in 1917. James W. Blackwell, a machinist, is the earliest known occupant of this house in 1930. It is a frame two-story, foursquare with hipped roof features, a hipped dormer with shingle siding, two interior brick chimneys, and a one-story hipped wraparound porch with paired battered posts on brick bases and plain railing. Fenestration consists of a glazed and paneled door, an oval leaded glass window, a two-story bay window on the left side and one-over-one-sash windows. The entire back add-on can’t be saved. If we lose this house,  let it become a ‘Penn Station’ inspiration.

“The loss of Penn Station in New York sparked new vigor into the city’s emerging preservationist movement. When Grand Central Terminal was similarly put onto the chopping block in 1972, activists and city leaders rallied against the developers who wished to replace the landmark with yet another modern office block. The terminal received landmark status and is today a jewel in Midtown Manhattan’s crown. It cannot be said how many other pieces of New York’s architectural history could have met their end had the outrage at the destruction of old Penn not changed forever the way cities view their brick-and-mortar heritage. Penn Station remains one of the (if not the) most painful losses New York has suffered architecturally over the past century.  But its destruction paved the way for a revolutionary new approach to architectural preservation which might not have ever come to pass had Penn not fallen the way it did.” Click here to read more about Penn Station with fantastic black and white photos to support this well written piece. 

This Villa Street house is the result of a series of ‘if only.’ An owner who bought this house for retirement had things happen along the way and became unable to keep it up, even selling the house was thwarted because of deed complications. ‘If only’ ordinances long ago had been applied to protect this house. It occurs to me that 306 Villa and others like it need an ombudsman. We are not without resources like Preservation Rocky Mount, and the Historic Preservation Commission.  The city department of Development Services where Kelly Cook is charged with the administration of ordinances, when allowed to do their jobs, can help  investors and private citizens traverse the complexities of  buying, saving, and repurposing our architectural inventory. Ordinances need not become obstacles, or a form of control.  The top priority of those involved with ordinances and related matters should be, “We will work with you until we find a ‘yes answer’ for buying property. We will guide you through the complexities of grants and preservation guidelines.” What we hear is one nightmare story after another of investors who are discouraged by a system that deliberately seems to derail a successful purchase.  Everyone loses;  nothing is added to the tax base and the loss of private investment is unnecessary.

It may be too late, the house may be unredeemable. It isn’t too late to apply triage and prioritize an inventory of homes that need intervention.  The only consolation that could possibly help if this house is lost is to spark further determination and vigor in our preservation efforts. All hands on deck, of one accord, and to persevere.

An app on my phone covers the deterioration and lets you imagine how fabulous this house is if saved.

 

Historic Villa Place District Has Its Own Realm……

“Architecture has its own realm…a sensitive container for the rhythm of footsteps on the floor, for the concentration of work, for the silence of sleep.”
Peter Zumthor, Thinking Architecture

I’m feeling a bit nervous like when I was first taken home to meet the parents of the boy I was in love with. Would they like me? Would they appreciate my hidden talents? Would they see past my obvious flaws and embrace the possibilities of me?

What’s Stepheny going on about now?  You’re coming to the Historic Villa Place District home and walking tour on Saturday, at least I hope you are. I fell in love with the neighborhood the first time Charles Dunn (Rocky Mount Way Back When) drove me to see where his grandparents lived on the south side of Hammond St. (413), Two of his great-aunts lived at 206 Villa Street, one of whom, Miss Fannie Gorham, I have written about earlier.

The question I’m jittery about is….. will you see what I see in visiting Villa Place? Addicted to architecture as I have become over the years, I’ve come to believe that over time, the people who have occupied a home remain in the dust motts that are caught in the light from the sun-drenched window. Maybe Daphne du Maurier, an author I love, started me down this path of believing that if we use our imagination we will encounter the lives and stories that remain.

“Who can ever affirm, or deny that the houses which have sheltered us as children, or as adults, and our predecessors too, do not have embedded in their walls, one with the dust and cobwebs, one with the overlay of fresh wallpaper and paint, the imprint of what-has-been, the suffering, the joy?” ― Daphne du Maurier, Myself When Young

I’m trying to resist the notion that I must take each of you by the hand and steer you past the few properties that should come down while extolling the virtues of the homes that are waiting for a believer who will buy, restore, and bring new life and joy to Villa Place. I will resist sounding like the gardener who tells you when you visit, “You should have seen the garden yesterday.” I mustn’t make an excuse as the mother does when she tells you the reason her child is cranky is because they’re over-tired. I want everyone who takes the time on Saturday to tour the four interiors, one garden, and two walk-bys, plus any driving you do, to get excited as I am about the possibilities where wonderful homes have already been restored, a neighborhood and story to honor, an area to be proud of.

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Villa Place Tales – The Kids that Grew Up in Villa Place

She sat on the porch and watched the moon rise. Soon its amber fluid drenched the earth and quenched the thirst of the day.
Zora Neale Hurston (edited SFH)

Throughout the South you find front porches tucked beneath deep overhangs. These open-air rooms continue to beckon family and friends where they gather to enjoy a cool breeze and some peace and quiet after a long day.  You will discover porches throughout the historic Villa Place neighborhood. Preservation Rocky Mount and the City of Rocky Mount invite you to a two-day event to celebrate the history, architecture, and the wonderful people who live in Villa Place and preserve beautiful structures. You will find the Villa Place neighborhood is an investment opportunity and a place to call home. 

Join the “kids” that grew up in Villa Place on Friday – Oct. 20th  (7:00 -8:30)…at Braswell School for a free event. Rocking together on the ‘front porch,’ the following folks will be telling tales of Villa Place. There will be time to add a few of your stories as well.

Polly Reynolds Warner, Emma Lynn Bass Wheeler, Sarah Johnson Tripoili and her Mom, Pat Strange, Fred Tulloss and Johnny Brown will be remembering parents, neighbors, friends, the games they played, and more… plus their thoughts about Villa Place today.

Hopefully, the two-day event will help the community reconnect with our historic districts, beginning with Villa Place. PRM encourages the preservation, rehabilitation, or restoration of historic properties that are important to the revitalization of the area. Show your support for this interesting neighborhood by attending Villa Place Tales on Friday, Oct. 20th and the Home and Walking Tour on Oct. 21st. A community that takes pride in its history and an interest in the preservation of its architectural assets, not only reaps economic benefits but improves life for all its residents.

The Home & Walking Tour Begins at 320 S. Pearl St. on Saturday, Oct. 21st 1-4:00. Pick up your tour booklet and make a much appreciated $5.00 donation to help defray costs. I look forward to seeing you!  Hey, bring some friends with you.

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YOU ARE INVITED TO A FREE EVENT: Save the Date – Friday, October 20th – 7:00-8:30 PM – Braswell School

“We owe it to each other to tell stories.” – Neil Gaiman

It’s easy to imagine….Parents on the front porch, children playing under the street lights, the heat of the day lifting, cicadas chirping in the trees. Look, there is Polly Reynolds over on South Howell, and Nancy Reynolds living behind the Tulloss brothers, Robert Watson on Western Avenue and Fred Fuller that moved into the Watson house on the corner of Nash and Howell. Billy Easton, Pat Longwell and Jackie Brantley playing on Tillary. What was it like to grow up in Villa Place? A group of ‘kids’ are getting together to talk about who they played with, who their neighbors were, to remember places like the Stankus Soda Shop.  On Friday evening, October 20th at 7:00PM, please join us at Braswell School for TALES OF VILLA PLACE. There you will find rockers on a front porch where Polly Reynolds Warner, Emma Lynn Bass Wheeler, Sarah Johnson Tripoli and her Mom Pat, and others, will be telling stories of growing up in Villa Place. There will be time for the audience to add a tale.

This is going to be a special time for neighbors, friends, realtors, investors looking at a great location a few blocks walk from downtown, for everyone, to enjoy this special two-day event. This is a gathering to celebrate the architectural and historic roots of Villa Place while celebrating the 150th anniversary of the City of Rocky Mount. There will be folks to introduce and thank, but the night is about story-telling. If you prefer, on Friday evening, you can make your $5.00 donation, which will help defray costs, and pick up your lovely colored tour booklet featuring six homes and additional information. OR at the starting place for the house and walking tour on Saturday, Oct. 21 from 1-4. The tour begins at 320 S. Pearl St.

Please share this invitation on your social media 

Help Preservation Rocky Mount spread the word.

 

 

 

                            

                                   

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Behind the Scenes: Historic Villa Place Walking Tour Events – Put These Dates on Your Calendar

The Historic Villa Place District is Getting Ready for Company  

Friday, Oct. 20 –  7-8:30 PM – Villa Tales -Growing Up in Villa Place                            

          @Braswell School – Corner Pearl & Nash Street  (Now the Tar River Academy)                                         

Saturday, October 21, 1-4 PM – Villa Place Walking Tour

The Villa Place Historic neighborhood located three blocks west of Main Street is the most intact early-twentieth-century residential area in the city of Rocky Mount. The densely developed neighborhood is filled with glorious architecture…Queen Anne, Foursquare, Craftsman, Bungalow, Colonial Revival and Neoclassical Revival style houses built between 1900 and the 1940s. I wish you could have been with me this summer preparing for the tour by meeting some of the ‘folks’ that keep the faith in this amazing area. I will admit that at times I have to put on my Pollyanna glasses when facing the disrepair and blight that some of the houses face, but we are not going to let these problems keep us from looking at the large picture; the glass filled with possibilities, assets, wonderful people and location, location, location.

For several hours one lovely Saturday afternoon, I sat for the first time with Shari & Jack Dunn, who own a Colonial Revival Style Cottage that will be featured on the Walking Tour. They have owned the house since 1991. They know many of their Villa Place neighbors and love the life they have created there. Sipping lemonade, it was amazing how peaceful and quiet Nash Street is – a slight breeze thrown in for good measure. Our voices could have been mistaken for any of those who over the years, have enjoyed this special space.

The Dunn’s home will be featured on the tour along with five others. Three of the home-owners will be inviting us inside to enjoy first floor rooms only. We will visit a private garden at one of the featured houses. There will be additional suggestions of what to see in a color printed Tour Brochure, which you will receive at the 1st house on S, Pearl Street.  A $5.00 Donation will help defray the costs of the Walking Tour and the Friday evening program, which is free. More details to follow.

Villa Place is filled with people that want what we all want. A safe place to live, fair taxes, decent health care, good schools. They look forward to showing you how important it is to preserve and restore these architectural treasures and what happens if you don’t. Villa Place is the perfect place for investment with its abundance of good people, architecture, and proximity to downtown Rocky Mount. It’s a place that has fascinating stories to tell.  Don’t miss this opportunity to enjoy the Historic District of Villa Place. Next time I will tell you about the event on Friday night. Follow Main Street Rocky Mount so you don’t miss anything. I look forward to seeing you Oct 20-21st.

 

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Who Lived at 202 Villa in the Villa Place Historic District? Getting Ready for the Villa Place Walking Tour Oct 21, 2017

You will find this recently renovated one-story brick veneer Minimal Traditional dwelling, with a pedimented stoop and paired classical posts, in Villa Place Historic District.  The house, now ready to ‘flip’  is feeling good about itself, like a lady showing off a brand new hat.  The preservation of this home is a gift to the neighborhood and to our Rocky Mount community because each time a renovation takes place that preserves the architectural integrity of a house, yet brings it new life, everyone wins.

 The house once belonged to Lonnie Embro Bass (1894-1976) and his wife Mamie Goodwin. (1905-1986.) Their daughter, Emma Lynn Wheeler grew up in this home. Lonnie was a World War I veteran, a  farmer, and opened Bass Brothers General Hardware at 130 Howard Street with his brother, Ollie Bass. After 30 years, the business closed in 1958. When one of the partners died at the Rocky Mount Shoe & Clothing, Lonnie bought into the business as a silent partner and was an owner until he died. (The business was next to Mebane Shoes.)  Mamie was a registered nurse before becoming a stay at home mom.  When we think of clothes drying in the sun, we feel nostalgic for simpler times,  but I feel quite sure Mamie’s generation of housewives would love to have had my washer and dryer. Since learning something of Mamie’s life I am remembering her while putting clothes in the dryer! Emma Lynn says of her mother, “When the doors at First Baptist Church were open, she was there!”  The Bass family lived in the house from 1939-1948 when it was sold. An obscure tidbit: the family rode out Hurricane Hazel in the basement of their Villa Street home.

During Preservation Rocky Mount’s Villa Place Walking Tour on October 21st. 1-4:00, you will pass by this unassuming residence. It won’t be featured in the Walking Tour Booklet as an outstanding example of one of the architecture styles found in Villa Place, but its value is priceless. Ask the little girl who lives on in Emma Lynn. While growing up, she can tell you about the people who surrounded her family home.  Neighbors like Mayor E.F. Duke and Police Chief J.I. Nichols on Howell Street.  J.K. Murrill who ran the cleaners on Western. Miss Mary Dodge or Tom Jenkins, whose Dad was a fireman; they both lived on Villa Street. Harvey & Jane Coley lived across from Emma Lynn and became like a second mother to her. Sam Parham also grew up on Villa Street. You begin to get it, right? A unique neighborhood with amazing people, a wonderful story to tell, a treasure trove of architecture. We will be tipping our hat when passing Miss Fannie Gorham’s home, CLICK HERE TO READ ABOUT MISS FANNIE, so be sure to do the same for Lonnie & Mamie Bass.

PUT THE VILLA PLACE WALKING TOUR ON YOUR CALENDAR OCTOBER 21 -1-4PM

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Who Lived at 206 Villa in the Villa Place Historic District? Getting Ready for the Villa Place Walking Tour Oct 21, 2017

Do you remember this wonderful song? Grab your coat and get your hat, leave your worries on the doorstep, just direct your feet to the sunny side of the street…I’ve been singing this lately thinking about the Villa Place Historic District Walking Tour on October 21, 1-4 pm. The organization, Preservation Rocky Mount, is hosting this event along with the residents of this charming neighborhood and the City of Rocky Mount while celebrating its 150th anniversary. The Tour will highlight Architecture and Preservation and give you a renewed appreciation for this neighborhood within walking distance of downtown. Be sure to mark your calendar!

PREPARING FOR THE TOUR….WHAT AM I LOOKING AT?

In the photograph above you are looking at the Harper House. The frame, one-story, three-bay hipped roof bungalow features a tin roof, plain siding, exposed rafter tails, a hip dormer with three Union Jack paned casements, one-over-one sash windows, a glazed and paneled door, and an engaged porch with paired and triple battered posts on brick bases with cross braces. The house was built circa 1917 for John A. Harper, the assistant secretary of the YMCA in Rocky Mount who is the earliest known occupant of the house in 1930.

Fannie Gorman, a beloved and esteemed educator, lived in the house for many years. Here is young Patsy Gorham (great niece) and Charles Dunn (great nephew) unveiling “Miss Fannie’s” portrait upon her retirement in 1955. All these years later we are all indebted to Charles for his Facebook page, Rocky Mount Way Back When. In the spring of 1953, Edgemont School was renamed Fannie W. Gorham School to honor its beloved principal. Two years later, on the occasion of Miss Gorham’s retirement, the PTA presented two special gifts to the school; a lovely oil painting of “Miss Fannie,” which was placed on the front wall of the auditorium. The second gift was a bronze plaque, placed to the right of the front entrance, and inscribed with these words:

FANNIE W. GORHAM
SCHOOL
Named in Honor Of
Fannie Whitfield Gorham
Principal 1917-1955
“She openeth her mouth with wisdom and in her
tongue is the law of kindness.” Proverbs 31:26

Miss Fannie died in 1980 at age 93. In delivering her funeral eulogy, her pastor declared, “I think I am well within bounds when I say that there have been presidents and governors and mayors and congressmen who have exerted less influence on the present shape of our city and its quality of life than was exerted by Miss Fannie Gorham.” In 2005 she was inducted into the Twin County Hall of Fame. On the Walking Tour, be sure to tip your hat at Miss Fannie’s door, remembered with great affection, and think of her enjoying the home she occupied for many years.

“Old buildings whisper to us in the creaking of floorboards and rattling of windowpanes.”
 Fennel Hudson, A Meaningful Life – Fennel’s Journal – No. 1

 

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We’re Headed to Villa Place Historic District – One of the stars in Rocky Mounts Crown

CLICK ON IMAGE BELOW TO ENLARGE FOR EASIER READING


An Invitation
Come with me on an adventure
Destination: Villa Place Historic District
Walking Tour
October 21, 2017

Recently I visited friends at Carolina Meadows in Chapel Hill. I noticed an elderly lady concentrating on a puzzle that residents can work on if so moved. The image of this solitary woman has stayed with me. I know it’s because I think of the revitalization of Rocky Mount like a puzzle worked by individual people, groups, and organizations who are placing one piece at a time.

Carrying this puzzle idea with us in the weeks to come, I want you to concentrate on the Villa Place Historic District Neighborhood Pieces, a source of pride and a neighborhood that is vital to the future of Rocky Mount. It is the first of the 7 historic districts Preservation Rocky Mount plans to focus their attention upon believing that the preservation of our neighborhoods is of historical, economic and social significance for a successful future. 

If you are of a certain age, you were allowed to run free in the neighborhood where you grew up. You rode your bicycle everywhere and nobody worried. When the fireflies began to light up in the shrubbery, or the street lights came on, it was time to head home. All these years later if we close our eyes, we can transport ourselves back to the neighborhood we call home where memories still abide of our parents, the children we once were, the ‘kids on the block’ jumping rope or playing hop scotch on the sidewalk, playing baseball in the park.

Villa Place was such a place on the west side of the business district of Rocky Mount. Now a designated Historic District, it spans approximately 35 acres and is composed of all or part of 23 blockfaces. 171 structures contribute to the historical significance of the District. Though Machaven sits vacant, this Neoclassical Revival residence at 306 S. Grace still presides in a stately fashion over the neighborhood but is by no means the end-all of the story. The ladies reading this will understand the image of a lovely necklace with Machaven as the center and largest bead, but the rest of the beads that are different in size and color, are what make the piece.

In future posts throughout the summer, we’ll get ready for the tour with some architectural information that makes up this beautiful necklace, give you some behind the scenes tour goings on, and hopefully, peek your interest as we make our way towards October. (Just so you know, if I win the lottery, the house on the corner of Villa and Nash is mine.) It’s a gem longing for a new life and purpose, a family to shelter, perhaps a bread and breakfast offering hospitality. Sherry & Jack Dunn, sitting on their porch right across the street, are members of the  Advisory Team that will help Preservation Rocky Mount plan this tour and make sure it’s a great experience. You’re going to love these neighbors, envy their quiet streets and beautiful homes. Let me know if you would like to help PRM with the planning and successful outcome of honoring the past of Villa Place while building a future here in Rocky Mount. We would welcome your local knowledge of this wonderful neighborhood. It’s going to be great fun!

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Villa Place Historic District – ‘The Ice King’ Cometh – Part 2

Machaven -Park Street Side View
Machaven -Park Street Side View

There must be a special place in hell for people who vandalize buildings. In taking photographs of Machaven, I wouldn’t dream of a photo that shows the front windows boarded up. Such an embarrassment for a historic place that has been holding court at 300 Grace Street these many years. Like a woman who knows her best side, the tilt of her chin just so, we will consider this princely place from a different angle to avoid further humiliation.

300 Grace St. -Machaven
300 Grace St. -Machaven               Park Street Side View

Introducing J.W. Hines (1858-1928): Hines made his fortune as the “ice king” of North Carolina, owning ice plants in railroad towns across the state from Rocky Mount to Salisbury. He became a developer and industrialist and is credited with his involvement in Rocky Mount’s early twentieth-century growth. Hines built tobacco warehouses, helped bring the Atlantic Coast Line repair shops and Emerson Shops to south Rocky Mount in 1892. In 1905  J.W. Hines purchased the 300 block of South Grace Street from R.L. Huffines and in 1907-1908 constructed the impressive Neoclassical Revival style brick mansion, known as Machaven, for his family. I hope you will take the time to read an earlier post about Machaven. Click Here

 Though Machaven is the principal landmark in the Villa Place Historic District, it is but one architectural gem in this depository worth a king’s ransom to architectural historians, preservationists, and to the city of Rocky Mount because of its close proximity to the revitalization of downtown where housing is needed for a growing workforce. If you read much of this blog, you know I am always excited and jumping up and down about something. Take my hand as we walk the neighborhood while I point out,  “Look at this one!” “And this one!” These Queen Anne, Foursquare, Craftsman, Colonial Revival style houses were built between 1900 and the 1940s by employees of the Atlantic Coast Line Railroad and other businesses in an emerging, successful railroad and tobacco town. You probably know someone who grew up right here on this corner!

If we threw a dart at a Rocky Mount map, no neighborhood is more worthy of a concerted effort to adopt and rally behind, than Villa Place. Our churches participate in community outreach in all kinds of faraway places like Minnesota and Mexico. Why not in our own backyard in a place that is significant to our future? Between now and when you read Villa Place – Part 3 –  I hope you will find time to get in your car with new eyes to see how fabulous this area is.  I invite you to FOLLOW Main Street so you don’t miss future posts.

419 Nash Street
419 Nash Street
222 Villa -For sale Boone Hill, Allen & Ricks 443 4148
222 Villa – For sale Boone Hill – Allen & Ricks  443 4148

 

336 Villa
336 Villa